Ward Village launches sales for Ke Kilohana

Ke Kilohana at Ward VillageThe Howard Hughes Corporation (NYSE: HHC) announced Friday that it is launching sales for the reserved housing program in its newest Ward Village project, Ke Kilohana at 988 Halekauwila St.

Applications will be available from Saturday, March 26 until Sunday, April 3, at the Ke Kilohana Sales Gallery in the IBM Building at 1240 Ala Moana Boulevard, open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Completed applications must be returned in person between April 8 and April 13. Buyers will be selected in a lottery to be held April 15 via webcast, with home selection beginning on April 16 based on lottery placement and running throughout April.

In a statement, Ward Village explains, “The lottery will simply assign an appointment date, according to the selected order, for the buyer to come in to select his/her home and complete the contracting process. Buyers will be informed of their appointment time via email.”

There are 375 reserved housing residences reserved for qualified buyers in the 43-story, mixed-use condominium high-rise. These include one-bedrooms priced from $323,475 to $442,246, two-bedrooms priced from $473,789 to $538,612, and three-bedrooms priced from $521,774 to $560,774. The tower also includes 49 market-priced residences.

Competition for the reserved housing units may be stiff — Ward Village notes that more than 3,500 people attended informational seminars on Ke Kilohana in over December, January and February.

A. Kam Napier
Editor-in-Chief
Pacific Business News


 

Ke Kilohana at Ward VillageReserved Housing Application packets may be obtained from the Ke Kilohana Sales Gallery starting Saturday, March 26, 2016 at 10:00 a.m, and will be available for pickup through Sunday, April 3, 2016 at 5:00 p.m. Applications will not be available for pickup after Sunday, April 3, 2016 at 5:00 p.m. Prospective purchasers should carefully review the information contained in the Reserved Housing Application packet to determine whether all eligibility requirements are met.

The earliest date that completed Reserved Housing Applications will be accepted is Friday, April 8, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. Reserved Housing Applications will not be accepted prior to this time. Applications must be hand-delivered to the Ke Kilohana Sales Gallery between Friday, April 8, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. and Wednesday, April 13, 2016 at 11:59 p.m. to be eligible to participate in the Lottery. Only substantially complete applications will be accepted. Applications delivered by email, facsimile, mail or courier will NOT be accepted.

Completing the application packet will include;
1. Notarized Affidavit of Intent to Purchase and Reside in a Designated Owner-Occupant Reserved Housing Residential Unit;
2. Notarized Affidavit of Eligibility to Purchase a Reserved Housing Unit in the 988 Halekauwila Condominium Project;
3. 988 Halekauwila Registration Agreement – Reserved Housing Owner-Occupant; and
4. Loan Pre-Qualification Letter provided by Honolulu HomeLoans or First Hawaiian Bank.

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Hawaii agency rejects plans to develop key Kewalo Basin Harbor lot

The Hawaii Community Development Authority is scheduled to hear plans from The Howard

The Hawaii Community Development Authority is scheduled to hear plans from The Howard

The Hawaii Community Development Authority rejected Wednesday two developers’ plans to develop a key portion of the lands surrounding Kewalo Basin Harbor in the Honolulu neighborhood of Kakaako, but approved The Howard Hughes Corp.’s plans for the two other lots.

John Whalen, chairman of the HCDA board, said that the lot that both developers had plans for— the former McWayne Marine Supply site — is a key piece out of all of the three lots in question.

“The board has lots of concern with significant commercial development around the harbor and how it fits in with the central function of Kakaako as a harbor and accessibility for public uses,” he said. “Leasing public lands is a serious issue and commitment, particularly in public lands where there is adjacent public use. We understand the need to raise revenue for the state, but there are other ways we can do that and keep public spaces [intact].”

Whalen also had concerns that the current board did not issue the original request for proposals for the development of the three sites surrounding the harbor.

The Texas-based developer, The Howard Hughes Corp., had plans for all three parcels surrounding the harbor — the former McWayne Marine Supply site, the charter boat building site and the former National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration lot.

Kewalo Waterfront Partners, which includes Japanese-based firms Good Luck International Corp. and Hinamari Hawaii Inc., had plans to renovate four buildings totaling 45,000 square feet at the former McWayne Marine Supply site. Although Kewalo Waterfront Partners only submitted a plan for this site, it did plan to do small renovations at the other two lots.

Its original plan that mostly remains the same for the former McWayne Marine Supply site, which is between Ala Moana Beach Park and Kewalo Basin Harbor, includes a permanent indoor farmer’s market, food halls, a chef’s club, a signature cafe, a beachside cafe, a multi-use venue that could host weddings, a live music venue, a sunset lounge, a public viewing dock, a lei stand, a community garden, a water feature and a parking structure.

Kewalo Waterfront Partners, in its updated plan, broke the buildings down into five parcels, included a convenience store, and refined the project’s architecture. Building heights also were lowered and more ground level parking was added.

The Kewalo Waterfront Partners’ project, over a 30-year span, would’ve brought in more than $100 million in lease revenue. It also would’ve been responsible for $1 million in off-site infrastructure improvements, create 800 jobs and 250 parking stalls.

Howard Hughes, whose 60-acre Ward Village master-planned community is across the street and which manages the harbor, significantly scaled down its plans, including doing more landscape improvements and upgrades to the lot between Ala Moana Park and Kewalo Basin Harbor.

At the charter boat building lot, the developer plans to add grab-and-go vendors that will provide items such as bottled water, sunscreen, slippers and towels, as well as a take-out lunch place.

The HCDA voted 6-2 to approve Howard Hughes’ plan for this lot.

In the former NOAA lot, the developer plans to pay homage to the “ice house” that was once located at the site and was used to supply ice to harbor-based fishing boats. The Kewalo Ice House would be transformed to include indoor-outdoor courtyards, bringing people together with shared interests in art, food, music and the ocean.

The state agency voted 5-3 to approve the developer’s plan for this lot.

In total, Howard Hughes lowered its project cost for improvements to the existing buildings and open spaces to $6 million.

Duane Shimogawa
Reporter
Pacific Business News

Early-morning fire reported at Howard Hughes condo project under construction in Honolulu

11/15/2015

11/15/2015

An early-morning fire on Wednesday was reported on a high floor of The Howard Hughes Corp.’s $403 million Waiea luxury condominium project under construction in Honolulu’s Kakaako neighborhood.

Honolulu Fire Department spokesman Capt. David Jenkins said fire crews first received a call at 4:57 a.m. about a two-alarm structure fire at 1044 Auahi St. He said the first responders arrived at 5:02 a.m. to find that there was a fire at the upper level of the Waiea project, which has been under construction since last summer.

Rob Centra, senior vice president of design and construction management at Ward Village for The Howard Hughes Corp. (NYSE: HHC), said the fire occurred on the 21st floor of the Waiea project, which will eventually have 36 stories. Centra did not disclose the extent of any damage but did say the fire was not expected to delay construction or push back the building’s planned completion date in late 2016.

The isolated blaze was brought under control by 5:43 a.m. and fully extinguished two minutes later. No injuries were reported, and investigators are working to determine the cause of the fire.

“There were complications, since the building was under construction,” Jenkins told PBN on Wednesday morning. “The standpipe system did not go up to the area that was on fire, so the fire department utilized three fire extinguishers and a utility hose at the site to bring the fire under control.”

A damage estimate was not immediately available.

Darin Moriki
Reporter
Pacific Business News

The Howard Hughes Corp. says it will begin construction on Ward Village’s Aeo mixed-use, residential tower, including Oahu’s flagship Whole Foods Market, in March.

AEʻO AT 1001 QUEEN

The 466-unit complex, designed by architects Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, will be located at 1001 Queen Street and built on the site of what is now the former Nordstrom Rack and Office Depot building, which will be razed to make way for the new development.

Ward Village representatives say they are continuing to work with Office Depot, since no specific moving date has been set yet.

When completed in 2018, Aeo will include studios, one-, two- and three-bedroom residences that overlook the ocean and range in size from 409 to 1,331 square feet. The building will also have a lap pool; a dedicated family activity area with a pool and children’s play area; a climate-controlled gym; an outdoor lanai for yoga and meditation; a wellness center with steam and sauna rooms; a private theater; a dog-run area; surfboard and bicycle storage; and outdoor dining spaces.

Apart from the 50,000-square-foot flagship Whole Foods Market will be built on the ground floor of Aeo, the mixed-use development will also include approximately 12,000 square feet of additional retail space, with outdoor seating and retail parking.

Darin Moriki
Reporter
Pacific Business News

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Holiday ice skating rink planned for Howard Hughes project in Hawaii

Workers prepare for a private grand opening of the newly renovated IBM building.

Workers prepare for a private grand opening of the newly renovated IBM building.

Although The Howard Hughes Corp. has had similar open-air ice rinks at some of its Mainland properties, including Summerlin in Las Vegas, company representatives say the one that will be built at Ward Village in Honolulu will serve as the company’s first ice rink that will be operated in tropical weather.

The Howard Hughes Corp. applied for a building permit with the City and County of Honolulu on Oct. 6 for a public ice-skating rink at the former IBM building, with an estimated value of $200,000.

With less than a month left to the start of this year’s holiday shopping season, The Howard Hughes Corp.’s Ward Village in Honolulu plans to roll out something new this year to get shoppers into the spirit: a public outdoor ice skating rink adjacent to the developer’s retail properties in Hawaii.

The Howard Hughes Corp. confirmed to PBN on Wednesday that Ice Rink Events, a Conroe, Texas-based producer of seasonal public ice-skating rinks, will manage a 4,200-square-foot ice skating rink that the company will construct at the former IBM Building, which now serves as the sales and information center for its Ward Village master-planned community in Kakaako, that will open on the day after Thanksgiving, better known as Black Friday.

Darin Moriki
Reporter
Pacific Business News

Longs Drugs to open Hawaii store in Ward Village’s 988 Halekauwila mixed-use project in Kakaako

long_ward_villageLongs Drugs will open a new Hawaii location in Ward Village’s 988 Halekauwila mixed-use tower in Kakaako that’s scheduled to be ready for occupancy in 2019, Howard Hughes Corp. executives confirmed to PBN on Tuesday.

“It’s something that has always been on our wish list for quite some time,” Katie Kaanapu, community and retail marketing director for The Howard Hughes Corp. (NYSE: HHC), told PBN. “It’s in a really central location, so it’s easy for our residents and visitors to access, whether they are coming by rail, or walking or biking to the area.”

As it is currently proposed, the 23,000-square-foot, full-service Longs Drugs store will be located on the ground floor of 988 Halekauwila, which will have 375 one-, two- and three-bedroom reserved affordable housing units.

The store will be located across the street from the future Kakaako Station for Oahu’s elevated-rail mass-transit system.

“Ward Village is committed to making Honolulu a better place for our local community to live, work, shop and play,” Nick Vanderboom, senior vice president of development for The Howard Hughes Corp., said in a statement. “This new Longs Drugs will allow Ward Village residents and other members of the nearby community to comfortably meet their daily needs with greater convenience.”

Though an opening date has not been set, Kaanapu said the entire 988 Halekauwila project is slated to be complete in 2019. Designs for the building are being finalized, she said.

Last week, the Hawaii Community Development Authority gave its approval for the project to proceed with 424 for-sale units, including 375 reserved units. Earlier, it had rejected The Howard Hughes Corp.’s request to turn them into rental units.

Construction also is continuing on the Texas-based developer’s Waiea and Anaha mixed-use towers, which are slated to be finished at the end of 2016 and the second quarter of 2017, respectively.

Meanwhile, condominium sales have begun for The Howard Hughes Corp.’s 466-unit Aeo project, which is scheduled to be complete in 2018.

Darin Moriki
Reporter
Pacific Business News

Hawaii agency delays decision on redevelopment of Kewalo Basin Harbor lands

Howard Hughes Corp. to start work this fall on Kewalo Basin Harbor redevelopment in Honolulu

Howard Hughes Corp. to start work this fall on Kewalo Basin Harbor redevelopment in Honolulu

The Hawaii Community Development Authority has delayed making a decision on two separate proposals from two developers on renovations to the lands surrounding Kewalo Basin Harbor in the Honolulu neighborhood of Kakaako.

At its regular meeting on Wednesday, which lasted until nearly 6 p.m., the state agency that regulates development in the area heard once again from The Howard Hughes Corp. (NYSE: HHC) and Kewalo Waterfront Partners, a partnership between two Japanese firms, and planned to make decision.

But after heading into executive session, John Whalen, chairman of the HCDA board, said that the board needed more time to consider the two plans, and noted that some board members were not present to vote.

The board plans to make a decision on what to do with the three parcels surrounding Kewalo Basin Harbor at its meeting on Dec. 2.

The Howard Hughes Corp. has plans for all three parcels surrounding the harbor — the former McWayne Marine Supply site, the charter boat building site and the former National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration lot.

Kewalo Waterfront Partners, which includes Good Luck International Corp. and Hinamari Hawaii Inc., has plans to renovate four buildings totaling 45,000 square feet at the former McWayne Marine Supply site. Although Kewalo Waterfront Partners only submitted a plan for this site, it does plan to do small renovations at the other two lots.

Its original plan that mostly remains the same for the former McWayne Marine Supply site, which is between Ala Moana Beach Park and Kewalo Basin Harbor, includes a permanent indoor farmer’s market, food halls, a chef’s club, a signature cafe, a beachside cafe, a multi-use venue that could host weddings, a live music venue, a sunset lounge, a public viewing dock, a lei stand, a community garden, a water feature and a parking structure.

Kewalo Waterfront Partners, in its updated plan, broke the buildings down into five parcels, included a convenience store and refined the project’s architecture. Building heights also were lowered and more ground level parking was added.

Ron Iwami, president of the community group Friends of Kewalos, spoke in opposition of Kewalo Waterfront Partners’ plan mainly because it is too dense. He said he prefers The Howard Hughes Corp.’s plan because it is less dense and said that the developer has been listening to his group from the start.

The Kewalo Waterfront Partners’ project, over a 30-year span, would bring in more than $100 million in lease revenue, be responsible for $1 million in off-site infrastructure improvements, create 800 jobs and 250 parking stalls.

Howard Hughes, whose 60-acre Ward Village master-planned community is across the street and which manages the harbor, significantly scaled down its plans, including doing more landscape improvements and upgrades to the lot between Ala Moana Park and Kewalo Basin Harbor.

At the charter boat building lot, the developer plans to add grab-and-go vendors that will provide items such as bottled water, sunscreen, slippers and towels, as well as a take-out lunch place.

In former NOAA lot, the developer plans to pay homage to the “ice house” that was once located at the site and was used to supply ice to harbor-based fishing boats. The Kewalo Ice House would be transformed to include indoor-outdoor courtyards, bringing people together with shared interests in art, food, music and the ocean.

In total, Howard Hughes lowered its project cost for improvements to the existing buildings and open spaces to $6 million, according to Race Randle, vice president of development for the Texas developer.

Randle said the developer would like to renovate all three lots, and that whatever happens, the projects need to be holistically planned and implemented at one time because the lots surround a working harbor with many small businesses that need to be kept in mind as improvements are made to the surrounding lands.

Dean Okimoto, owner of Nalo Farms in Windward Oahu, opposesthe Texas developer’s plan for the Kewalo Basin Harbor lands and is in favor of the Kewalo Waterfront Partners’ project because it supports local farmers.

He raised concerns about The Howard Hughes Corp. already owning and operating the 60-acre Ward Village across the street, and that the developer would only be monopolizing the area even more if its proposals are chosen.

Duane Shimogawa
Reporter
Pacific Business News

Howard Hughes Corp. may ‘adjust’ prices for some units at Honolulu condo tower

Whole Foods MarketSEE CORRECTION AT THE END OF THIS ARTICLE

The Howard Hughes Corp. says it may “adjust” the sales price of its remaining condominium units in its Aeo mixed-use residential project in Honolulu in response to the high demand and interest seen since an initial lottery began last month for the project, which will include Whole Foods Market’s new Hawaii flagship store.

An e-mail sent by Ward Village Residential Sales Director Dwight Synan to prospective buyers said the new prices will take effect on Aug. 10. He also noted that all of the studio units in Aeo, which had a starting price of $405,016, were sold out.

He said people who have already expressed interest in the project can purchase a unit at the old price before the price increase takes effect.

As it is currently proposed, The Howard Hughes Corp. (NYSE: HHC) has said the 466-unit complex will also include 60,000 square feet of retail spaces. Construction on the project, which will be built on the Office Depot and former Nordstrom Rack site behind the Ward Entertainment Center complex, is slated to be complete by 2018.

Under the new price list, prices for one-bedroom units will start at $817,000. Initially, the starting price for those units was $573,000, but all the lower-priced units have sold out. Prices for two-bedroom units will start at $1.04 million, instead of the previous $860,000 since those lower-priced units have also sold out. Prices of three-bedroom units will start at $1.76 million.

Some real estate industry experts say the decision to increase prices is not a surprising one and are the result of demand for more housing options.

“It’s uncommon, but it is market driven, and we have an uncommon market relative to the rest of the world,” Ricky Cassiday, real estate economist from Data@Work, told PBN in an email. “Hawaii residential property can be very volatile, especially on the upside. Historically, we have seen price appreciation at double-digit increases.”

Jon Yamaguchi, president and CEO of his Yamaguchi & Yamaguchi Inc. real estate appraisal and consulting services company, said the big question now is what type of role will speculative buyers will eventually have on the market.

“Those are the ones who are going to hurt the market because we’ve seen it before,” Yamaguchi said. “If you’re spread very thin, you don’t have the financial backing, and you’re banking on flipping it, but it doesn’t happen because there’s too much supply, then you’re going to have all of these guys who are going to start dumping and that’s when you start having a falloff market.”

Construction also is continuing on the Texas-based developer’s Waiea and Anaha mixed-use towers nearby, which are slated to be finished at the end of 2016 and the second quarter of 2017, respectively. Meanwhile, the design process is being finalized for the master planned community’s 988 Halekauwila project, which will have 375 one-, two- and three-bedroom affordable units and is slated to be complete by 2019.

CORRECTION
The story has been revised to clarify that the lower-priced units have sold out.

Darin Moriki
Reporter
Pacific Business News

 

Hawaii agency approves Howard Hughes’ Kakaako residential project

This rendering shows The Howard Hughes Corp.'s planned 988 Halekauwila project

This rendering shows The Howard Hughes Corp.’s planned 988 Halekauwila project

The Hawaii Community Development Authority gave its final approval Wednesday on The Howard Hughes Corp.’s Kakaako residential project at 988 Halekauwila St.

The Texas-based developer plans to start construction on the mostly affordable for-sale condominium tower across from Sports Authority by late 2016, according to its senior vice president of development, Nick Vanderboom.

“We have no exact timeframe,” he said to the HCDA board. “We’re committed to moving the project forward as fast as we can in order to bring it to the market.”

The project, which was originally approved by the HCDA as a for-sale development, was then proposed by the developer as a rental project.

However, the HCDA board struck down that request and told Howard Hughes to stay with its original plan as a for-sale project.

Its original permit includes building a tower with 424 for-sale units, including 375 reserved units.

“Ward Village looks forward to working with the HCDA board and towards a shared vision for a healthy, livable Kakaako that the entire community will enjoy and appreciate,” said David Striph, senior vice president of Hawaii for The Howard Hughes Corp., in a statement. “We are committed to affordable housing at Ward Village, and will do so with a for-sale project at 988 Halekauwila, as originally approved by the HCDA. [On Wednesday], we finalized the next steps to move the project forward as quickly as possible.”

The project, which is being planned for the former site of the Kanpai Bar & Grill and Dixie Grill, and the current California Rock ‘N Sushi, is part of The Howard Hughes Corp.’s first phase of its 60-acre Ward Village master plan.

Under the current rules, Howard Hughes can’t move people into its Waiea and Anaha luxury condos, which are also part of phase one, until it puts financial assurance that it will build 988 Halekauwila, or starts construction on the project.

Duane Shimogawa
Reporter
Pacific Business News

Luxury Honolulu condo Waiea foregoes … trash chutes?

A penthouse in the proposed Waiea tower in The Howard Hughes Corp.'s Ward Village in Honolulu, seen in this rendering has a price tag of $20 million, the developer said Friday.

A penthouse in the proposed Waiea tower in The Howard Hughes Corp.’s Ward Village in Honolulu, seen in this rendering has a price tag of $20 million, the developer said Friday.

The Howard Hughes Corp.’s Waiea luxury condominium, currently under construction in the Texas-based developer’s 60-acre Ward Village in Kakaako, was designed and is being built without trash chutes, the developer confirmed to PBN.

The 36-story, 171-unit condo going up on a former parking lot across from the Ward Consolidated Theatres is one of the first high-rises in Honolulu to skip this common feature.

The developer’s other luxury condo, Anaha, being built diagonally across from Waiea on a former Pier 1 Imports site, has trash chutes.

Race Randle, vice president of development for The Howard Hughes Corp., told PBN in an email that Waiea has been designed with trash and recycling rooms on each floor, in lieu of trash chutes.

“This is based on common practice in luxury high-rise developments in cities such as Vancouver and London where trash and recyclables are conveniently collected by staff,” he said. “This proven method, which is being applied to Waiea, offers an added level of service to residents, ensuring effective service and encouraging recycling as part of our LEED Platinum neighborhood.”

When asked by PBN whether other planned condos in Ward Village would have trash chutes, the developer would not specify if any other projects would follow Waiea’s trash and recycling room design, only to say that this method may be applied to future buildings at Ward Village.

In its condo public report released in November, The Howard Hughes Corp. said that there would be no trash chutes in Waiea.

For at least two other condo developments currently under construction in Kakaako, Alexander & Baldwin Inc.’s The Collection and OliverMcMillan’s Symphony Honolulu, trash chutes are being incorporated into the projects, according to their condo public reports.

Waiea was designed by award-winning Vancouver-based architect James K.M. Cheng in collaboration with Honolulu architect Rob Iopa, president of WCIT Architecture.

Nordic PCL Construction is the general contractor for the project at 1118 Ala Moana Blvd.

Duane Shimogawa
Reporter
Pacific Business News

Company Disclaimer: Information is deemed reliable but not guaranteed.